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Acupuncture is inefficient in the case of practical diseases

Acupuncture is inefficient in the case of practical diseases

Acupuncture is ineffective in chronic pain, an American study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine shows. The researchers investigated patients affected by fibromyalgia, the second rheumatic disease, after arthritis.

Acupuncture is ineffective in chronic pain, an American study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine shows. The researchers investigated patients affected by fibromyalgia, the second rheumatic disease, after arthritis.
These people had diffuse chronic pain and pain in different areas of the body. For 12 weeks, patients underwent standard acupuncture after allopathic treatments had been previously performed. The conclusion was that acupuncture has the same results as placebo in terms of pain relief. Patients have noticed that their condition is improving rapidly during acupuncture treatment. But, after the cessation of therapy, the pains returned, said Dr.

Dedra Buchwald, the author of the study.
The results of the study were challenged by Adam Burke, an acupuncture specialist and assistant professor at the University of San Francisco.
He argued that, in general, acupuncture should be performed for at least one year and should be associated with alternative therapies, especially phytotherapy. Dr. Gabriela Papazian-Urdareanu, a primary physician, specialist in phytotherapy, acupuncture and homeopathy, from the National Center for Acupuncture and Homeopathy Bucharest, in turn denied the results of the above study, considering that "acupuncture is really indicated in the treatment of chronic diseases. Usually, it is associated with phytotherapy, homeopathy or laser therapy. "