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Obesity in infants

Obesity in infants

Question:

- My baby is 4 months old and weighs 8,850 g after the last check. I mention that he was born with a weight of 3,500 g and was breast-fed. The doctor assured me that there is no problem, the child is alive and active, but I still worry about his weight that goes beyond the normal limits. Also thinking about a possible diet? Eat about 5 times a day breast milk and lunch and sometimes grated orange juice. Thank you.

Answer:

Obesity in infants may have a genetic predisposition, misconceptions in infant nutrition, and rarely endocrine causes.

Obesity in infants may have a genetic predisposition, misconceptions in infant nutrition, and rarely endocrine causes.
The measures to combat and prevent obesity in infants are the following:

  • promotion of natural nutrition (with breast milk)
  • if the baby is artificially fed, use the correct dilution of milk
  • respecting the number of tables
  • start of diversification to do only after 4-41 / 2 in the infant fed artificially and after 5-6 months in the one fed exclusively to the breast
  • do not put solid foods in the bottle
  • it is postponed the introduction of cereals (gray, instant cereals, biscuits) in the diet to infants who gain too much weight in the first months
  • avoid sweets, sweet juices or excessive sweetening (of tea)
  • physical activity is promoted: outdoor walks, freedom of movement (left free in crib or tar).
    Therefore, if the doctor has not detected a health problem, there is no need for a diet. Because early diversification favors obesity would have been good if you had not started diversification by the age of 5 months, given that it is breast fed.
    Continue to postpone the moment you introduce cereals into your diet: do not add cereals or biscuits to fruits, avoid flour, potatoes, juices and sweet foods.
    Alina Pop-Began
    - Resident physician - Anesthesia and Intensive Care -
    Specialist details