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Birth with anesthesia causes difficulty in breastfeeding

Birth with anesthesia causes difficulty in breastfeeding

Women who are born with epidural anesthesia may have difficulty in the first week after birth, which may cause them to stop feeding their newborn baby, this is the conclusion of an Australian study published in the International Breastfeeding Journal.

Women who are born with epidural anesthesia may have difficulty in the first week after birth, which may cause them to stop feeding their newborn baby, this is the conclusion of an Australian study published in the International Breastfeeding Journal.
The study was conducted by a team of researchers from the University of Sydney and 1,280 women participated. The study's authors claim that breastfeeding difficulties occur due to the substances contained in anesthesia, which causes the baby to drowsiness and feeding difficulties during the first days of life. "It is important for mothers to be properly informed and counseled, to know that this is only a temporary phenomenon," said study coordinator, epidemiologist Siranda Torvaldsen.


The study also revealed that 72% of mothers who chose to give birth naturally breastfed their baby for at least the first six months of life, compared with 53% of those born through Caesarean section.
In the UK, about 20% of women opt for epidural anesthesia at birth. This consists in the insertion of a catheter between two vertebrae of the spine, in the epidural space, the substance used having the role of removing the pain sensation.
Read the whole article in: Current
December 12, 2006

Tags Breastfeeding immediately after birth