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Babies learn early, but forget quickly

Babies learn early, but forget quickly

When adults think of the times before high school, they hardly remember those times, but when those baby eyes set their mother and father's eyes, in reality they formed memories. The sad fact is that they forget very quickly.

When adults think of the times before high school, they hardly remember those times, but when those baby eyes set their mother and father's eyes, in reality they formed memories. The sad fact is that they forget very quickly.
"In fact, the forgetfulness rate of babies is higher than in adults," says Patricia Bauer of Duke University at the annual meeting of the American Association for Advanced Science.
Researchers have long speculated that babies do not have the ability to have memories, but Bauer argues the contrary after new research. Lisa Oakes of the University of California says that "While the rate of memory development varies in infants, some are very intelligent instead.

They are able to extract any kind of information from the environment. "
The ability to store memories depends on a network of brain structures, and these develop separately over time. The researchers found that when the network is developed (between 6-18 months of life), babies can have short-term memory.
As young children and adults forget, Patricia Bauer compared the brain of the child and the adult with a strain. In the case of the adult, the brain resembles a small-hole treadmill, through which you can slip small things, while in the case of a child's brain, it resembles a very large-hole treadmill, which lets the information "slip".
In his studies, Oakes observed babies for as long as they fixed an object or a person. Babies will look for something new longer than something familiar, which allows researchers to calculate how long this short-term memory lasts.