Information

What is my child doing?

What is my child doing?


A tired child, bored, irritated, with an intense program, but without satisfaction? Maybe this is a model we are targeting in education from the desire of parents to have a smart and talented child, a skillful and resourceful teenager, a young man capable of succeeding in life.
Ballet lessons, field tennis, computer science, painting, English, piano. The program can become extremely loaded, and apparently the child does not excel in any of these areas. It is a more common problem than it seems.
Studies of large groups of children in the United States have shown that one in five children is talented in drawing, music, dance or sports skills. Unfortunately, not all those who are inclined to a certain activity have the possibility or support from their parents to use their skills.
Can we still know how much of this is pleasing to the child in this jure? Which fit her and which are nothing more than a burden, consuming her free time and so insufficient?
All these activities that become an integral part of the daily schedule can become a real chore if they are not part of the sphere of interest of the child or he has no inclination towards them.
Many of the skills are lost precisely because they are not identified early or because the parent fails to pay enough attention and support the child in strengthening that ability. The parent may be tempted by the variety of options available to them and consider that a large number of activities in which the child is involved ensures a harmonious and balanced development. But most of the time this means blurring and even disappearing of inclinations.
Since childhood, a series of stimuli acts on the child, on the basis of which he builds his own experience.
Together with his parents, he knows and explores what is around him (at home, in the park, on the street, along with other children or adults). As it develops and forms its own personality based on assimilated acquisitions, some activities will please them, preferring them to others: painting, singing, dismantling, puzzle making, etc. The nature of the child's interest also provides information on the level of intellectual, affective, social acquisitions, and equally helps the parent to orient himself in choosing the right activities.
Thus, the parent may run daily with the child to dance, computer science, theater, German, volleyball, etc. or encourage him to lean on one or more of these directions, which are pleasing and for which there are skills.
The aptitudes crystallize throughout the period of psychosocial development and maturation, as the personality structure is formed. The child has the opportunity to grow them, if they benefit from the support and encouragement of their parents in their development.
An aptitude discovered in time and cultivated through activities aimed at improving the child's performance can be transformed in time into a future successful profession. On the other hand, the involvement in many activities, very varied, can lead to over-solicitation, poor results, confusion and even the refusal of the child to carry out these activities.
No matter what age the children are, they feel the things they do. I know what they want, what they like, what annoys them or is unpleasant. It is good for parents to take into account the wish and opinion of the child when making decisions regarding his / her involvement in different activities, whether they have an intellectual, sporting or artistic character.
Knowledge of the skills plays an essential role in the moments of decision such as the exams passing from one stage to another in the education system. These moments give rise to questions about the direction, the way the child is going.
Do you have the necessary skills (intellectual, artistic, sports) to attend a certain high school? Do you feel that your choice is appropriate? Do you like that field?
A choice determined by external factors (parents, teachers decision, criteria based on the popularity of certain fields of activity or on the "market pulse") can lead to school failure, integration and adaptation difficulties.
How could we find out which direction the child is best prepared for?
CPAP - The Center for Action Psychology and Psychotherapy launches the campaign "With the child visiting the psychologist". The specialists of the center want to come to meet the difficulties felt by parents in detecting and capitalizing on the qualities of their children, in identifying risk factors that can affect the balanced development of the child.
The campaign has as its motto the skills: Is my child good at it? Here's a question for all parents who want to guide their child on a path to success. Together we could make this question an answer.
Psychologist Cristina Calarasanu
www.centrupsihologie.ro